FILMS 

Still from Richard Woolley's film Girl from the South

Girl from the South 

1988, 84 mins 
 
Poor little rich girl into Mills & Boon fantasies falls for unemployed black boy up north and tries to ‘help’. Festivals: Finland, Germany, Canada, Australia, Prix du CIJEF (sponsored by UNESCO) in Laon, France, 1990. Sold world¬wide for TV. 
ANNE is the daughter of well-to-do parents in the South of England. Like many young girls of her age, she reads romances and, on a trip to her grandparents in the North, she decides to write her own story and live it out at the same time. So, one morning, bored with Granny's attempts to entertain her, she leaves the safety of the rich suburbs and sets out towards 'the poorer part of town' determined to meet her own real-life, tall dark stranger. Walking up a street of back-to-back houses – and still in her daydream – ANNE bumps into an old woman (GRANNY WHITE), sending her shopping flying. A lucky accident as the old woman's grandson, RALPH, turns out to be exactly the boy she is looking for... well, nearly – he does have a strange penchant for art galleries and Elgar. But ANNE doesn't only fall in love. Discovering that not everyone is as rich as her, she determines to balance things out by persuading RALPH to take part in an unusual form of burglary. She assures him that if things go wrong, she will own up and say it was her fault. "They'll never believe you!" says Ralph. And they don't. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Cori Films/ Spectre Productions 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Colour Fiction Feature Film 
Topic: Romantic teenage rich girl from South falls for poor black boy in North. 
Available as: DVD or other digital format. 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk. 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Production: Jean Stewart 
Camera: Janet Tovey 
Sound: Bruno Heller/Soma 
Music: Adrian Rhodes 

CAST 

Alan Thompson......Grandfather 
Daphne Oxenford......Grandmother 
Keith Weinstein......Lance 
Mark Crowshaw......Ralph 
Michelle Mulvaney......Anne 
Rosamund Greenwood......Granny White 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Waiting for Alan

Waiting for Alan 

1984, 45 mins 
 
Sonata form drama centred on ritualised boredom of a middle-class housewife. Shown on CH 4 in Feb l987 & April 199O. Broadcast in Sweden, Germany, Holland and Canada. 
WAITING FOR ALAN is about a woman whose marriage is dead. Trapped in the rich but sterile environment of a lavishly appointed country house, MARCIA is a microcosm of society – a victim of, and partner in, someone else's routine. It’s not the housework or the cooking (MRS BETTS looks after those), but the daily monotony of waiting for ALAN – her newspaper-reading, TV watching husband. To him, she's just the emotional central heating switched on and off in return for paying the bills and expected to operate as smoothly and regularly as the washing-up machine or the gardener. But MARCIA has waited long enough… WAITING FOR ALAN is a humorous but critical 'tale of the unexpected' (and expected) in classical, three-movement sonata form. It was screened at least twice on Channel Four television in the late eighties and both times received a very positive audience response as well as praise from weekly pre-viewers in the newspapers. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Telltale Films/Channel Four 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Colour Film Drama 
Topic: Lonely housewife determines to break husband’s boring routine 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Russell Murray 
Sound: Moya Burns 
Dubbing: Alf Bower 
Music: Beethoven, Satie, Chopin – performed by Gerald Wragg 

CAST 

Anthony Schaeffer......Alan 
Carolyn Pickles......Marcia 
Mrs Betts......Joyce Kennedy 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Brothers & Sisters

Brothers and Sisters 

1981, 96 mins 
 
Alternative thriller about murder of a prostitute in a Northern city. Festivals included New York, Chicago, Berlin, Florence, Melbourne, Edinburgh and official British entry status at Moscow. Screened by Ch 4 in l984 and 1989 and broadcast on TV worldwide. 
BROTHERS AND SISTERS is a very different kind of thriller – a provocative investigation of sexual violence and mores both inside and outside of film. When JENIFER COLLINS, a part time prostitute, is found murdered, two upper-class brothers become suspects. Neither have alibis and although political rhetoric divides DAVID BARRATT, a self indulgent 'revolutionary' living in a communal house, from his brother, James, a right wing army major, both men are linked by their shared sexual hypocrisy. James, it seems, prefers secret liaisons with prostitutes to sleeping with his wife. While David, who has been sneakily conducting an affair with Theresa, the dead woman's sister employed by James as a nanny, bleats that he has just been 'trying to work out new codes of sexual behaviour', when challenged by Tricia, his live-in lover. 
 
"By a clever juggling of murder-thriller suspense and soap-opera naturalism, Woolley shrewdly anatomises Anglo-Saxon attitudes to sex and the sexes" Financial Times 
 
"A continuously interesting picture, formally adroit and persuasively acted" The Observer 
 
"Woolley has the rare gift of keeping you anxious to know what happens next" The Times 
 
"The film achieves an unexpected immediacy with Carolyn Pickles giving an impressive performance..." Time Out 
 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: British Film Institute 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 35mm Colour Feature film 
Topic: Reflective thriller revolving around murder of prostitute in Northern city 
Available as: 35mm, 16mm, DVD or other digital format (pending) 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley and others 
Production: Keith Griffiths/Peter Sainsbury 
Line Producer: Jim Pearse 
D.O.P.: Pascoe Macfarlane 
Sound: Alf Bower 
Editing: Mick Audsley 
Dubbing: Doug Turner (Delta Sound) 
Music: Trevor Jones 

CAST 

Carolyn Pickles......Theresa Bennett/ Jennifer Collins 
Elizabeth Bennett......Sarah Barratt 
Jenifer Armitage......Tricia Snow 
Robert East......James Barratt 
Sam Dale......David Barratt 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Telling Tales

Telling Tales 

1978, 90 mins 
 
Looks at issues of gender and class. Screenings at festivals in Berlin, Edinburgh and London; widely shown in UK, Germany and elsewhere. Screened CH 4 TV in 1982. 
TELLING TALES is about the failing marriage of an industrialist and his wife, about the industrialist's wish to sell his company to a colleague, Paul Roberts, and about the terminally ill wife of Paul, Ingrid. It is also about the shop steward organising a strike at Paul's factory that jeopardises the deal with the industrialist, and about the wife of the shop steward, who happens to clean and cook for the industrialist. A network of intertwined tales told in different ways, and for very different motives, by the main protagonists. Drawing on TV traditions of soap and serious drama, the manipulative emotionalism of a Hollywood weepy, the austerity of minimalism and the directness of Brecht, TELLING TALES both entertains the emotions and stimulates the intellect, making viewers aware of the act of viewing as well as letting them lose themselves in the viewed artefact; it draws them in with odd gobs of gaudy, conventionally-cut colour and spits them out with immaculately choreographed black & white single shot sequences. Born of the 1970's narrative deconstruction school, this is a unique gem of its time. 
 
"This impressive film… boldly and illuminatingly tackles two of today’s most pressing problems: the relationship between women’s emancipation and class difference and the role of the media in preserving the status quo." Time Out 
 
"One of the leading films from the independent cinema sector." TV Times 
 
READ LONGER REVIEW (Scroll down to fourth item

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Yorkshire Arts Association 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm b&w/colour feature 
Topic: Alternative drama playing with conventions of soap, tearjerker and stage 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Russell Murray 
Lighting: Alf Bower 
Sound: Moya Burns 
Dubbing: Keith Hardy (Yorkshire Film) 

CAST 

Bridget Ashburn......Sheila Jones 
James Woolley......Mr Willoughby/Paul Roberts 
Patricia Donovan......Mrs Willoughby/Ingrid Roberts 
Stephen Trafford......Bill Jones 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Illusive Crime

Illusive Crime 

1976, 50 mins 
 
Experimental narrative dealing with female oppression/class control. Controversial at time, especially among feminists. 
Probably the most controversial of Woolley's films, because of an audio rape sequence with flashes of nudity that split critics and viewers (especially feminists) right down the middle – some saying it was exploitative, others saying it was essential to get the formalist message (that we are all voyeurs in the cinema, often viewing at the expense of women) across. The film tells the tale of a housewife (who we never totally see, but can hear) trapped in her luxury house at the mercy of a husband and ruthless police team investigating an illusory political crime that she may or may not have committed. Her husband (the only character we see in a conventional manner) comes in and out of the story and alternates between patronising solicitousness and cold anger. The whole is constructed around a relentlessly repetitive sequence of shots that, in the course of the film, moves ten times from wide shot exterior to intimate interiors, with the story being updated and narrated every time we return to the exterior. In each sequence, there is one POV handheld shot that varies and is usually from the wife's point of view; otherwise the story is told within the confines of the repeating images (same framing and camera movement) with only the action varying. Voiceovers narrate and reflect on a woman's position, as well as dominant male perspectives, in society. 
 
"A serious and thorough artist, Woolley’s films collectively encompass all those issues which are at the centre of current critical debate: from the Straub-like impact of the deliberate camerawork and distanced acting and direct address in INSIDE AND OUTSIDE (DRINNEN UND DRAUSSEN) to the ironic narrative of ILLUSIVE CRIME and structural rigour of KNIEPHOFSTRASSE. Despite stylistic variety, these films are not pastiche, nor is Woolley a dilettante; rather his consistent concern has been to articulate image and sound through shifting relationships which challenge the very production of meaning through the conjunction of image/sound." Time Out 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Yorkshire Arts 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Colour (Kodachrome reversal) Experimental Fiction 
Topic: Oppression and victimisation of wife by husband and police 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Production: Richard Woolley 
Sound: Richard Woolley 
Editing: Richard Woolley 
Dubbing: John Murray 
Music: Richard Woolley 

CAST 

Amanda Reiss......Wife's Voice 
Andrew Mcullough......Police Voice One 
Colin Proctor......Police Voice Two 
James Woolley......Husband 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Inside & Outside

Drinnen und Draussen (Inside and Outside) 

1974, 40 mins 
 
Deals with filmic reality and conformity in East and West. Won acclaim at 1976 Edinburgh Festival. 
A film set in the front room of a Berlin commune with a large shop window leading to the street outside. The film uses an actor and an actress, a pianist (visible playing the film's incidental music in the room next door) and occasional people on the street. Scripted action is located inside the room, unscripted on the pavement outside where passers-by occasionally stop and watch the actors in the same way that the audience is watching them on screen from a cinema or the comfort of home. The 'intellectual/ aesthetic' rationale for the film (in the director's words at the time) was to: "signify the similarity of social codes in East and West; to cement – seal with a kiss (there is a central scene where the actor and actress kiss in the traditional Hollywood manner) – two systems that, despite surface differences, seduce and cajole their citizens into obedience and passivity; to emphasise the common bond of bourgeois family values and traditional role-playing prevalent in consumer capitalist and state socialist countries." An ambitious agenda for a short film, but the serious (immaculately delivered) speeches and exchanges on personal/social positions and solutions are lightened by Woolley's tongue-in-cheek filmic observations and the comedic role of a pianist, who provides live musical comment and life-support in the room next door. The ending, where the inmates escape from their intellectual prison to the reality of the street outside, is a simple but effective critique of the obsessive search for theoretical answers to everything that hallmarked the early 70's. 
 
"A serious and thorough artist, Woolley’s films collectively encompass all those issues which are at the centre of current critical debate: from the Straub-like impact of the deliberate camerawork and distanced acting and direct address in INSIDE AND OUTSIDE (DRINNEN UND DRAUSSEN) to the ironic narrative of ILLUSIVE CRIME and structural rigour of KNIEPHOFSTRASSE. Despite stylistic variety, these films are not pastiche, nor is Woolley a dilettante; rather his consistent concern has been to articulate image and sound through shifting relationships which challenge the very production of meaning through the conjunction of image/sound." Time Out 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: DAAD (Deutsche Akademische Austauschdiesnt) 
Country: Germany 
Type: 16mm Black & White Experimental Fiction 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Production: Ulrike Hentrich-Wimmers 
D.O.P.: Helmut Wietz 
Sound: Klaus Schroeder 
Dubbing: DFFB 
Music: Mozart, Sibelius, Schubert (performed by Theo Hardtman) 

CAST 

Theo Hardtman......Pianist 
Ulrike Pohl......Maedchen 
Wolfgang W. Mueller......Junge 
Still from Richard Woolley's film Kniephofstrasse

Kniephofstrasse 

1973, 35 mins 
 
Complex but compelling investigation of sound/image relationship shot in Berlin. Top prize at Knokke-le-Zoute film festival l975. 
The most austerely structuralist and painterly of Woolley's films, KNIEPHOFSTRASSE, is based around a fixed camera single wide shot of a West Berlin townscape filmed at different times of day and night, at different speeds and in different weathers. The core wide shot image is also – in a rigorously systematic manner, starting from top left and moving to bottom right – subdivided into twenty equal-sized segments, each of which informs the wide shot in a different way (the close up of a car, man in snow, bare branches of a tree, etc). Added to this visual jigsaw is an endlessly changing palette of sounds, which influence and change the way we read the wide shot and subdivided segments. Some sounds are conventional (snippets of dialogue, incidental music, excerpts from a German TV soap or advertisement, wind in trees or the revving of a car) and some are abstract (a single dissonant organ note for each of the twenty segments, a sequence of repeated organ notes for the wide shot). The whole, despite its black and white austerity and the rigour of its schema, provides audiovisual stimulation and food for thought in a manner that is hard to find in an age of synthesizers and digital imaging. The use of a Bolex camera's stop-framing and slow motion capacity is just one example of a low-tech approach achieving unexpected and original high-end aesthetic effects. 
 
"A serious and thorough artist, Woolley’s films collectively encompass all those issues which are at the centre of current critical debate: from the Straub-like impact of the deliberate camerawork and distanced acting and direct address in INSIDE AND OUTSIDE (DRINNEN UND DRAUSSEN) to the ironic narrative of ILLUSIVE CRIME and structural rigour of KNIEPHOFSTRASSE. Despite stylistic variety, these films are not pastiche, nor is Woolley a dilettante; rather his consistent concern has been to articulate image and sound through shifting relationships which challenge the very production of meaning through the conjunction of image/sound." Time Out 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: DAAD (Deutsche Akademische Austauschdiesnt) 
Country: Germany 
Type: 16mm Black & White Experimental Film 
Topic: Relationship between sound and image; perception of cinematic space 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Production: Brigitte Kleeblatt 
Camera: Richard Woolley 
Sound: Richard Woolley 
Editing: Richard Woolley 
Dubbing: DFFB 
Music: Various 

Freedom 

1973, 1 min 
 
Made for a competition in Chicago, man goes though his life – from forceps delivery birth to climbing into his own coffin – in one minute. 
Film made as competition entry for Chicago Film festival. Theme was ‘Freedom’ and eventual winner (also from the Royal College of Art) had children circling in animated slow mo on a roundabout. Woolley’s entry was dark and pessimistic with a man’s life moving from forceps delivery, through bullying at school to climbing into a coffin. The late Robert East (also in Woolley’s ‘Brothers & Sisters’) went on to be one of Blackadder’s sidekicks in the first series. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: Colour - experimental one minute competition film 
Topic: Man moves from birth to death in one minute 
Available as: DVD or other digital format 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Richard Woolley 
Sound: Richard Woolley 
Editing: Richard Woolley 
Music: Richard Woolley 

Propaganda 

1973, 10 mins 
 
Man trapped in front of – and then inside – a television, as a Tory political broadcast swirls around him. 
A TV screen displays a jumble of programmes in both real time and stop motion. The soundtrack mingles snippets of programmes, usually different from those on screen. At one point, after a political speech urging viewers to vote Conservative, a rousing song declaring that ‘times are changing’ turns out to be a jingle advertising glass. Amidst clips and flashes of TV static, a man appears on screen running towards the camera, shouting ‘Am I on the telly?’ Later, he approaches the camera and knocks on the lens/screen, ‘Am I in there?’ Each time he appears, he is increasingly insistent. Occasionally, another man appears in front of the TV, watching it, touching it and holding objects like scissors in front of it in silhouette. His movements are in stop-frame as is a moment when tape covers the screen spelling out the word, TV’. Final shot is of the Queen on the TV. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art/Richard Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Black & White. Experimental short 
Topic: Captivating and manipulative power of the television set. 
Available as: DVD 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Richard Woolley 

CAST 

Phil Mulloy 

Ten Shots 

1973, 10 mins 
 
To show effect of sound on picture and how meaning can change, ten shots and ten sounds are repeated until correct sound matches correct picture. 
Experimental short consisting of ten repeated shots set to deliberately mismatched sounds. The shots are: close-up of man’s eyes blinking; black shoes stepping back and forth; trees in a park; bells in church tower; torso of a person wearing a striped jumper and clapping his hands; cars on a city street; water pouring from a tap into a cup and overflowing; a nose and mouth mouthing; a person sitting on a bedroom floor, turning pages of a book; an empty glass smashed by a hammer. Never synchronised, the sounds that should match each shot are variously arranged to correspond with a different shot each time the sequence repeats. Occasionally, instrumental or choral music plays for the duration of one of the shots. Finally, after ten repetitions, image and sound synchronise. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art/Richard Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Black & White Experimental Film 
Topic: Proto music video that contrasts grey interior of a house with colour of its garden 
Available as: DVD 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Richard Woolley 
Sound: Richard Woolley 

Chromatic 

1972, 6 mins 
 
Clothed woman in exotic garden looks at herself trapped naked inside large country house. Extended music video (before genre really existed) to soundtrack by Jerry Garcia and Howard Whales. 
Experimental short contrasting the grey interior of a house with the vibrant colour of its garden. Sunlight shines through leafy trees. The camera zooms in until the image is out of focus. When it zooms out again, it reveals sunlight through leaves reflected in the window of a house. From inside the house, we see a woman, in colour and fully dressed, walk by a window. Outside, the camera and photographer are seen in a mirror. The woman, in black & white now and inside the house nude, walks around a large room, trapped. Further images of the naked woman are interspersed with colour images of the garden outside: pond, lilies, etc. Eventually, the image of the cameraman and his mirror returns and the reflection in the window and the sunshine through trees are repeated. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art/Richard Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm b&w/colour fiction/experimental 
Topic: Proto music video contrasting grey interior of a house with colour of garden outside 
Available as: Rough digital scan DVD of cutting copy. Graded digital version in preparation 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: Richard Woolley 
Sound: Richard Woolley 
Music: Howard Whales/ Jerry Garcia 

In Between Peace 

1972, 12 mins 
 
Surreal story of man haunted by noise pollution and fantasies of his own sexual potency, shot in London and Yorkshire countryside. 
We see the interior of a roofless church, then, in black & white, a woman on a bed listening to a radio. As cars and people bustle in city streets, the woman turns off the radio and folds her hands in prayer. The camera tracks through the churchyard and hits a gravestone. In her bed, the woman lights a cigarette, as does a long-haired man standing on the city street. The man puts on a gas mask, crosses the road and appears on a country path. He removes his mask, runs through the graves and puts an ear to the ruined church’s door. The woman knocks her alarm clock to the floor. It rings. The man in the churchyard puts a finger to his ear and is then seen standing in the church’s ruined window. On the lawn below, two men watch. One puts a finger to his lips: ‘Sshhh!’ Choir music mixes with the sound of sex as the woman writhes on her bed beneath a lowering shadow that seems to be both erotically stimulating and abusing her. Eventually, after a fast moving, 'psychedelic' journey through strange coloured landscapes, the woman re-emerges in the graveyard and meets the long-haired man. He leads her to the church door and puts her head against it to listen. She smiles on hearing music, reconciled to her experience as being mere 'Teenage Wasteland'. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art/Richard Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Black & White and Colour – Surreal Fiction 
Topic: Man and woman haunted by urban noise pollution and sexual fantasies. 
Available as: DVD 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Camera: John Mills 
Music: Various 

CAST 

Graham Frost 
Richard Woolley 
Sue Maddock 
Tim Lang 

A Prison Should be Dark 

1971, 10 mins 
 
Kafkaesque story of man arrested and imprisoned for no reason, and then – in impressionistic style – forced to reflect on his life. 
Fiction short about a man, John Andrews, who is arrested for an unknown crime, but who ultimately finds his confinement no worse than the monotonous life of work, wife and family he has been leading. Andrews is seized by two men and put in prison. He is told he has been sentenced to death but not informed of his crime. He is visited by employer and wife and, in between, we see snippets of his former life. Finally, his wife hands him a book labelled ‘John Andrews: 1940 - .’ The images are accompanied at times by music (both classical and pop) and by John’s own voiceover, which takes the form of a repeated poem. At the end, he is told he is free to go, but begs to be allowed to stay. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Royal College of Art/Richard Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Black & White – surreal fiction 
Topic: Man imprisoned for unknown crime reviews his life. 
Available as: DVD 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley 
Script: Richard Woolley 
Music: Various 

CAST 

Graham Moore 
James Woolley 
John Mills 
Lucy O'Connor Howe 
Toby Claridge 
Still from Richard Woolley's film We who have Friends

We who have Friends 

1970, 50 mins 
 
Looking at position of male homosexuals since l967 Reform Act. (co-directed and produced with Richard Reisz at King’s College London) 
A documentary shot on film in London and Leeds in 1969, looking at the situation of – and attitudes to – male homosexuals in the UK two years after the 1967 Reform Act. Contains unique interviews with: the Bill's initiator, Leo Abse; the Editor of the bi-sexual/gay magazine 'Jeremy'; social workers who regard 'gayness' as something to be 'cured'; the only gay man willing to appear on camera at that time (despite a comprehensive advertising campaign for candidates); vox pop taken in Leeds market and the East End of London. Location shooting in late 1960’s Leeds, Smithfield Market, at a nude male photo shoot for 'Jeremy' and at a fashion show in Carnaby Street. Sound interviews with gay men still firmly in the closet include a Smithfield meat market worker and a member of the gay Anglican community centred in High Holborn. The film was made independently but slated by the BBC to be broadcast. At the last minute, the Beeb backed out and did not show its first documentary on the subject (made in-house) until four years later. Co-director Richard Reisz went on to work for the BBC, amongst other things as Producer of Tomorrow’s World. Richard Woolley went on to make experimental and fiction films. 
 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Company: Reisz/Woolley 
Country: United Kingdom 
Type: 16mm Black & White Documentary 
Topic: Male homosexuality in late 1960’s Britain 
Available as: DVD of cutting copy and mixed master only. 
Available from: Yorkshire Film Archive (yfa@yorksj.ac.uk) 

CREW 

Director: Richard Woolley & Richard Reisz 
Camera: David Smith 
Sound: Philip Boxer 
Editing: Richard Woolley, Richard Reisz 
Archiving and digitisation in association with: 
Yorkshire Film Archive Logo British Film Institute logo
 
DVDs of selected films available. Viewing copies of other work not issued on DVD may be obtained on request from the Yorkshire Film Archive at: yfa@yorksj.ac.uk